The Soft White Sixties

The Wayfarer Presents

The Soft White Sixties

Kolars, Davis

Thu, March 9, 2017

8:00 pm

$8.00 - $10.00

This event is 21 and over

The Soft White Sixties
The Soft White Sixties
Five years together, and the members of The Soft White Sixties have rarely sat still. They’ve lived much of their life in a 15-passenger van, traversing the country, whipping up new riffs, new rhythms, new lyrics and then, almost immediately, breaking them out onstage. For these hard-working musicians, it was simply a way of life.

But the band needed to step back. “You don’t always need to be out there selling the song live,” lead singer and principal lyricist Octavio Genera says now. The Bay Area band, as he sees it, needed to exhale. The four musicians, who’d grown beyond close with one another since forming in 2010, owed it to themselves to give the new songs they were concocting their proper due.

“It was about giving these songs the attention they deserve,” Genera says of the band’s decision to hunker down in a one-bedroom house in East Nashville in the fall of 2014 to workshop what became their tightest, most sophisticated and melodic material to date. “Every little part of each song was really put under a microscope much more than we had in the past,” says guitarist and keyboard player Aaron Eisenberg, of constructing tracks armed with bluesy struts and squirms atop menacing guitar lines. “It was an exercise in patience for a lot of us sitting with parts for awhile and letting them settle,” Eisenberg adds. “You have to be able to step back and say, ‘Alright, cool there’s one idea. But is there a better one?’”

For the Sixties, who’d released their debut full-length album, Get Right in 2014, capturing a certain vibe and a particular mood for their next batch of recordings was essential. The band always took an 'all hands on deck' approach to writing, but in the past they chiseled their song arrangements on stage without a clear sense of direction for the final result. For the next album the musical collective — which includes bassist Ryan Noble and drummer Joey Bustos — made a conscious decision to apply a forward-thinking kind of approach, continually asking the question 'what kind of band do we want to be?' To further ensure an open-book approach to the sessions, the band enlisted producer/mixer Matt Linesch (Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeroes, Dave Mason), working with him at United Recording in Los Angeles. “Matt was almost like a fifth member, at times,” Eisenberg says. “He embraced our new approach, while really stressing the importance of the music not being perfect. It’s a human form of expression."

Who did they find themselves to be? “A band not afraid to embrace its murkier side”, says Genera. “We wanted the songs to have a little darker tinge to them than those on our last record. Live, the tones were always a little darker, and there’s a little more energy. We wanted to make sure to capture that in our recordings,” Genera explains. In-studio discussions often turned to films — and more specifically the ominous tones their respective soundtracks conveyed — band members loved so much. “A lot of the movies we love have a darker, grittier side to them, grit that our music has as well,” Eisenberg says, referencing the acclaimed works of filmmakers such as Quentin Tarantino, Paul Thomas Anderson and Martin Scorsese. “We wanted to write a song that would be used to introduce the villain,’” Eisenberg explains. 

For Genera, the new Soft White Sixties material marks some of his most autobiographical work yet. “It’s cliché to say music is my therapy but it’s so often true,” the singer says with a laugh. “With creativity there isn’t a manual. If the words are right and the feeling is right it doesn’t matter how you sing it. What you're trying to say will come through.” Many of Genera’s lyrical revelations, he says, center on his belief that “all too often, relationships make one lose sight of oneself in the process. Whether it be a man needing a girl to let him go rather than string him along with hopeless expectations, or a deep dive into the concept of being in the moment and being present.”

The Soft White Sixties have no doubt they’re on the right path. “It’s really about doing what you love, and realizing everyone is doing the same thing, just in a different way,” Genera says with a smile.  Scratching their creative itch — whether in songwriting mode or performing live — is what keeps them excited for what’s to come. Eisenberg says they have “a ton of other songs” they’ve been working on, not to mention a slew of music videos. Of course, they’ll also be hitting the road to reveal their new material for much of 2016. For Genera, however, everything really boils down to a simple motto he can’t shake. Says the singer with supreme confidence and conviction: “It’s always about doing it better than the last time.”
Kolars
Kolars
Rob Kolar sings and strums his rollicking guitar, Lauren Brown uses her whole body as a percussive instrument.

THE BOTTOM LINE - The dynamic duo is eclectic in every sense of the word. Kolar, who can only be described as a cosmic Elvis, sang with gusto while his counterpart provided the raw power that kept their steam engine sound chugging along. And with a musical style ranging from what they term “Desert Disco” to “Space Blues” (which is just as entertaining as it sounds), there was never a dull moment on stage.

CONSEQUENCE OF SOUND - Crafted like a grooving ’70s country song carved out of the gleaming vibrations of modern rock, the track pulsates right into your chest. It takes your heart by the hand and leads you to the dance floor, daring you to not feel motivated to dance, shimmy, just escape the mundane.

BUZZBANDS - Is it normal to imagine that all husband and wife bands rehearse naked? Or maybe it’s just that this particular sexy duo share the kind of on-stage chemistry that comes from knowing each other so well, musically and biblically, which sets the imagination a’sizzling. Kolar, with his rocker swagger, and Brown, licking her lips as she uses her whole body to tap and smack out the beats

FEST FIFTY - With gumption and undeniably well-written songs, KOLARS has burrowed through the consciousness of their hometown and beyond, paving a road of lullaby disco anthems wriggling their way across the Mason Dixon. An iconic moment and further proof that the band is so great at what they do was especially apparent during their performance at Tractor Tavern in Seattle

BANDSINTOWN - KOLARS is a highly experimental duo committed to creating a new sound that will thrill audiences all over the world. Singer and guitarist Rob Kolar is the mastermind behind their production, writing and mixing the material himself. Drummer Lauren Brown has created her own style of percussion where she dances out rhythms on a bass drum with her feet. They’ve successfully created an infectious, innovative sound that combines both folk and dance music.



KOLARS has created a sonic world that straddles self-described genres such as Desert Disco, R&Beyond, Space Blues, and Glam-a-billy . Rob produces, mixes, and writes the material. His studio experimentation is incorporated into the live show. Lauren has invented her own drumming style. She tap dances rhythms with her feet atop a bass drum while simultaneously playing a stand-up kit. She uses this dance to transform beats into natural extensions of her movement. The two perform with energy, sweat, and excitement, thrilling audiences with their unabashed exuberance.

As members of glam-folk band He's My Brother She's My Sister, Rob and Lauren toured the U.S. and Europe extensively and sold out venues in every major city across the states, playing Bonnaroo, Summerfest, Voodoo, Firefly, Secret Garden Party, and Austin City Limits, and performed on late night television (Craig Ferguson).

The band has taken their influences and experiences into a new futuristic realm with KOLARS.
Davis
Davis
After Davis heard Chuck Berry at the age of 12, he was compelled to pick up his first guitar – a Gibson 335. From California's Inland Empire, music shaped his childhood. Davis immersed himself in the iconic songwriting of such artists as Nirvana, Bob Dylan, and John Lennon, as well as the euphoric melodies of The Strokes and The Libertines. This fusion of musical interests gives Davis a unique sound all his own. His guitar tones are both unique and technical, while his vocal range gives him the freedom to hit Little Richard notes in an effortlessly cool manner. His sound has been compared to everything from Bob Dylan to Arcade Fire; Kings of Leon to Beastie Boys; John Lennon to James Brown.
Davis performs with a full backing band. He delivers Rock & Roll in a way that is both fresh and nostalgic. Currently working on his debut album, Davis hopes to push the Rock & Roll genre forward into new territories, writing honest and modern songs about timeless emotions. Davis has been recording all throughout the U.S., everywhere from an RV trailer park in Utah to the legendary Sound Emporium Studios in Nashville. Davis' writing taps into the history of American youth culture, just as his influences did with their songs. With a nod to the past, Davis looks forward.
Venue Information:
The Wayfarer
843 W 19th Street
Costa Mesa, CA, 92627
http://www.wayfarercm.com